This Might Surprise You: DeflateGate and 3 Surprising Facts in the Wells Report

This Might Surprise You: DeflateGate and 3 Surprising Facts in the Wells Report

Last post, I commented on how frustrating it was to hear announcers spout off about Tom Brady and Deflategate before reading the Wells Report. I decided to read it myself. My goal is to neither bash the Patriots nor exonerate them. I simply aim to provide an objective review of the Wells Report. CLIFF’S NOTES OVERVIEW NFL rules say the ball must be inflated between 12.5 and 13.5 psi. Teams prepare 12 footballs before games, and the refs check air pressure with a gauge. The NFL referee manual specifically states that if a ball measures below 12.5, the refs need to inflate it to exactly 12.5. If it’s above 13.5, the refs need to reduce it to exactly 13.5. (As stated on pg 36 of the Wells Report.) The problems that caused Deflategate, from what I can tell, stem from two inconsistencies. First, different gauges give different readings. For Deflategate, two gauges were used to measure psi at halftime and […]

Thinking Out Loud: Two Thoughts on Deflategate

THOUGHT ONE The “Deflategate” news train keeps rolling. Tom Brady has been found guilty in both the court of public opinion, and by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. His four-game suspension, currently under appeal, has been lauded by many. The media circus surrounding this controversy reminded me of what Irv Cross mentioned in The Game before the Money. He discussed the difference between today’s media and his approach while working on The NFL Today. “We reported,” Cross said. “You just didn’t wing things and sing things off the top of your head. If Tom Landry did something and I reported it, it actually happened. I had it verified, and had probably talked to the player directly involved. Today I hear, ‘I think this and I think that,’ but I don’t see much reporting.” True indeed. Few pundits bothered to read the Wells Report, duplicating the scenario that took place when baseball’s Mitchell Report hit the streets. Opinions abound, but nobody will […]

The Story of the NFL Draft and Recent Super Bowls

Last week we looked at the starting lineups of last year’s Super Bowl teams, wondering how much the draft led to the Seahawks’ and Broncos’ success. We found that while the draft was important, it appears to be equally important to find talent from other sources, likely because the draft is only seven rounds. Now we take a look at Super Bowl teams (including the Seahawks and Broncos) from the past 5 Super Bowls, plus the first Giants/Patriots game after the 2008 season. Turns out last year’s teams were below the average number of starters to be drafted for the period, although the Seahawks were only slightly under (54.2%). Of the Broncos 22 starters only 10 were originally drafted by the franchise, a figure equaled by the 2011 Giants as the lowest in our survey. The 2010 Packers led all teams with 17 of their draftees in their Super Bowl lineup. Only the Seahawks and Packers won the Super Bowl […]

BACK TO TOP